Louise  Farrenc

Louise Farrenc (1804-1875)

Nationality: French
Born: May 31, 1804, Paris
Died: September 15, 1875, Paris (age 71)
wikipedia

Clarinet Trio in E-flat major, Op. 44

(for cello, piano and clarinet)
I. Andante - Allegro moderato
II. Adagio
III. Minuetto. Allegro
IV. Finale. Allegro
Composed: 1840 (age 35-36)
Published: 1861 (age 56-57)
Dedication: Adolphe Leroy
Duration: 28 minutes (approximately)
3 recordings, 9 videos
7:25
Linos Ensemble
I. Andante - Allegro moderato
5:42
Linos Ensemble
II. Adagio
3:59
Linos Ensemble
III. Minuetto. Allegro
5:54
Linos Ensemble
IV. Finale. Allegro
10:21
Guyot, Salque, Engerer
I. Andante - Allegro moderato
10:11
Trio Eléonore
I. Andante - Allegro moderato
6:37
Trio Eléonore
II. Adagio
4:04
Trio Eléonore
III. Minuetto. Allegro
6:04
Trio Eléonore
IV. Finale. Allegro

From Edition Silvertrust:

Louise Farrenc"Louise Farrenc's Trio for Clarinet, Violoncello and Piano in E Flat Major, Op.44 was published by her husband’s firm Editions Farrenc in 1861. It was dedicated to Adolphe Leroy, an important French clarinetist who, like Farrenc, taught at the Paris Conservatory, Upon the suggestion of her husband, it appeared with an alternate violin part for the clarinet. No doubt, this was done with a view toward widening sales. The number of works for this combination which appeared before hers can be counted on one hand. The trio is in four movements and opens with a short dignified introduction Andante. The first subject of the main movement, Allegro moderato, is a lovely melody in the clarinet which recalls Carl Maria von Weber. The interweaving of the thematic material is very skillfully handled and the writing for clarinet and cello is perfect. The piano, as is typical in most Farrenc first movements, is given a somewhat florid but glittering part. The long series of triplet passages must be played lightly and with grace to avoid ruining the effect of the long-lined melodies in the other voices. The second theme introduced by the cello, is more representative of mid-19th century romanticism. In the Adagio, which comes next, first the cello and then the clarinet are given complete control of the thematic material of the first subject . It has a Beethovenian formality and feel. In the middle section, the clarinet gives forth the slinky second theme, clearly related to the first, but in the minor. Next comes a Minuetto, Allegro. The clarinet is given the lion’s share of the thematic material, which again recalls the writing of Weber. It is clearly more a sparkling scherzo than a stately minuet, the writing is tuneful and well-suited for the clarinet. In the finale, Allegro, the entire first theme and its restatement are given to the clarinet, this was no doubt done with dedicatee in mind. Again the music recalls Weber."

The Chamber Music Journal

Louise Farrenc (1804-1875) enjoyed a considerable reputation during her own lifetime as both a performer and a teacher. Her chamber music is on a par with most of her well-known male contemporaries, although unfortunately these works never achieved the renown they deserved and fell into oblivion shortly after her death. As a young girl, Farrenc, a piano prodigy, was fortunate in studying with such great masters as Ignaz Moscheles, Johann Nepomuk Hummel and Anton Reicha.

© Edition Silvertrust. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

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