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Arthur (William) Foote

Arthur Foote (1853-1937)

Nationality: American
Born: March 5, 1853, Salem, MA
Died: April 4, 1937, Boston, MA (age 84)
wikipedia

Three Character Pieces, Op. 9

(for violin and piano)
I. Morgengesang [Morning Song]. Andante
II. Menuetto Serioso. Quasi Recitativo - Moderato grazioso
III. Romanze. Adagio non troppo
Composed: (?) 1885 (age 31-32)
Published: 1886 (age 32-33)
Duration: 16 minutes (approximately)
2 recordings, 4 videos
15:23
Joseph Silverstein, Virginia Eskin
5:06
Kevin Lawrence, Eric Larsen
I. Morgengesang [Morning Song]. Andante
4:55
Kevin Lawrence, Eric Larsen
II. Menuetto Serioso. Quasi Recitativo - Moderato grazioso
5:51
Kevin Lawrence, Eric Larsen
III. Romanze. Adagio non troppo

From Edition Silvertrust:

Arthur Foote (1853-1937) was born in Salem, Massachusetts and was the first important American composer trained entirely in America. His main teacher was John Knowles Paine, from whom Foote gained an admiration for and was primarily influenced by the leading Central European Romantic composers of the day, such as Mendelssohn, Schumann, Dvořák and Brahms. After graduating, Foote became active in the musical life of Boston and made his living primarily by teaching the piano. He was fortunate in having friends and supporters who were able to arrange for his larger compositions to be performed by the Boston Symphony. Foote wrote approximately 200 works, most of these for voice. Roughly 75 have opus numbers. Though chamber music comprises only a small part of his output, these works are among his best.

The Three Character Pieces date from 1886 are in song form presented in a lyrical style reminiscent of the style but not tonality of Brahms. Highly praised upon their premiere, the works are evocative, particularly The Morning Song which evokes feelings of a clear, cool morning. The Menuetto Serioso begins with a violin recitatif which then becomes the dramatic main theme. The final work, Romanza, is full of lush harmonies and impassioned melodies.

Our of print for a very long time, we are pleased to present these wonderful works each of which can be played by itself, perhaps as an encore; or together to make up a full length work on a recital program.

© Edition Silvertrust. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

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